30.08.2018 PWT “Le Photographe Retrouvé” Otto Wegener

Otto Wegener was born in the southern Swedish town of Helsingborgs in 1849. The Swedish photographer Hanna Forthmeijer (1827-1914) established the city’s first permanent studio in Otto’s parents’ home in the mid-1860s.  (Cf. a local advertisement for this first studio of Helsingborgs published in 1867, the same year the young man left for Paris reproduced in Helsingborgs stadslexikon).

Because he had joined the Commune under the Garde Nationale uniform, Otto went in exile to London where his three sons were born]. He came back after 1875.

Nothing is known about his introduction to photography; all we know is that he opened his magnificient studio at the fashionable address 3, Place de la Madeleine in 1883, successfully competing with Nadar and Reutlinger for the elite audience.

Marcel Proust frequented Otto’s studio.

He also brought his favourite ladies from the nobility to Otto’s studio. Celebrated as the supreme beauty of her day, Countess Elisabeth Greffulhe (1860-1952) was the triumph of Parisian society when Marcel Proust made her acquaintance in 1892.

Proust pursued her with requests for a photograph, which she staunchly refused. Nonetheless, the countess would inspire Proust’s fiction, becoming a prototype for the glamorous Duchesse de Guermantes in A la recherche du temps perd (1913-27).

Acces au pdf : PWT 33-2018 Le Photographe Retrouvé (Otto Wegener)

Wegener had then already simplified his name to OTTO, a signature that shined in gold above the sixth floor on the building. He maintained contacts with the Swedish colony of artists and the writer August Strindberg dined in his house in 1894. The writers Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson and Victoria Benedictsson as well as the painter Albert Edelfelt are among the Scandinavians who had their photographs taken by Otto.

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Zonamaco Foto 2018: Turn on your lights!

The Copernican Revolution was the paradigm shift from the Ptolemaic model of the heavens, formulated by Nicolaus Copernic some time before 1514 and refined until the publishing of De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium in 1543.

Fifteen scores later, the Daguerreian Revolution was the paradigm shift from the classical representation of Nature and Human faces, formulated by Niépce some time before 1827 and refined by several gentlemen until the public announcement of 19 August 1839.

When the first photographic processes were invented and developped by Niépce and his followers in Europe, the photographic portrait was really born in America circa 1840. Robert Cornelius in Philadelphia and John Draper are the central figures.

We will present 17 early daguerrian portraits and an armil during Zonamaco Foto on stand B-316.

 

If you are in Mexico on Friday afternoon, do not hesitate to join the presentation on some famous daguerreotypes :

ACCESS TO THE CATALOGUE PWT 29-2018 

16.08.2018 PWT 31-2018 CHILDREN IN THE TEMPLE OF PHOTOGRAPHY

“Eugène Disdéri (1819-1889) was a French photographer who gained great fame for patenting his version of the carte de visite, a small photographic image which was mounted on a card. Disdéri, a brilliant showman, made this system of mass-production portraiture world famous. Disdéri’s’s cartes de visite were 6×9 cm, about the size of conventional visiting cards of the time, and were made by a camera with four lenses and a sliding plate holder; a design inspired by the recently-invented stereoscopic cameras. The novelty quickly spread throughout the world. According to Eduard Liesegand, a German colleague, Disdéri’s studio became “really the Temple of Photography — a place unique in its luxury and elegance. Daily he sells three to four thousand francs worth of portraits”. (Wikipedia)

Eugène Disdéri ou la photographie bourgeoise – quelques idées reçues

“Avec la photographie, la bourgeoisie a trouvé sa technique et son esthétique ; avec la photo-carte de visite – dont Disdéri dépose le brevet en 1854 – elle trouve son support et son usage.” « Puis, coup décisif, l’apparition de Disdéri et de la carte de visite qui donnait pour quelque vingt francs douze portraits quand on avait payé jusque-là cinquante ou cent francs pour un seul ». (Nadar). “Tous, bourgeois, aristocrates et rastaquouères, se faisaient photographier devant les décors de son invention » (Comtesse de Pange, Comment j’ai vu 1900, Grasset, 1962, p. 82).

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09.08.2018 PWT 30-2018. Investigating a possible candidate for the Long Lost Clyde Daguerreotype (I)

On Long Lost Daguerreotypes

This conference* is an introduction to the more general project of an essay on lost daguerreotypes following the principles of classical bibliography, and William A. Jackson’s recommendation about lost books:

“We must recognize that despite all the work of the collectors of the past, a considerable portion of what once was printed no longer exists, and it is possible that the study of such lost books may become a recognized part of bibliographical work, just as the paleon­tologists are forced to reconstruct beasts whose bones they have never seen. Researches into books that have not survived may prove to be far more fruitful than at first seems possible.”

Roger Stoddard, former librarian of the Houghton library and author of the celebrated 1982 bibliography, Lost Books: American Poetry before 1821, strongly warned about the danger of wishful thinking:

“For bibliographers the most disheartening feature of such studies is the nature of the evidence. Contrary to the rules of bibliography, any source but a complete copy of the book is used. Old descriptions in in­ventories or catalogues, advertisements of booksellers or printers, and copyright entries are often unreliable and easily misinterpreted. No careful scholar presents data from such sources without warning his readers or before seeking verification elsewhere. Some writers have been tempted to embroider and fill out the data, fictionalizing printing his­tory while showing off their knowledge of it. Only if properly handled can such data yield useful results.

We can follow his path and adapt his advice to lost photographs. The most famous photographic subject on earth is probably Abraham Lincoln.  The temptation of impatient wishful thinking has misled several collectors, conservators, curators and auctionneers during the past 68 years, transforming the hunt into a mine field.

Since the early 1960s every portraits which could be of Lincoln has been searched, scrutinized, dozens of announcements have been made in the press, on rados and televisions. All families of people who had meet with Lincoln have been visited. Only three candidates, three purported portraits came to a large public knowledge in 1966, 1977 and 1998…

2017. An anonymous image unearthed during a busy New York photo fair, During the AIPAD Photo week, after having been offered for several months on internet. “The sitter is a Lincoln’s doppelganger” raised as a question. But this plate is a daguerreotype. Paradox: — How could a lincolnian portrait precede Lincoln changing appearance by growing a beard?

Access to the first article : PWT 30-2018 Long Lost Clyde Daguerreotype

 CONFERENCE AND PUBLIC DEBATE :
FRIDAY 23 AUGUST 2018 AT 3 PM
ZONAMACO FOTO - LOMAS DE SOTELO – MEXICO CITY

https://zsonamaco.com/september/foto

PWT 29-2018 COPERNICAN ARMILLARY SPHERE : CONJONCTION OF PORTRAITS

The Copernican Revolution was the paradigm shift from the Ptolemaic model of the heavens, formulated by Nicolaus Copernic some time before 1514 and refined until the publishing of De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium in 1543.

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This Copernican Armillary Sphere (France, circa 1840) will be presented at Zonamaco Anticuario, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

Fifteen scores later, the Daguerreian Revolution was the paradigm shift from the classical representation of Nature and Human faces, formulated by Niépce some time before 1827 and refined by several gentlemen until the public announcement of 19 August 1839.

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This Daguerrian portrait (circle of Robert Cornelius, Philadelphia, circa 1840) will be presented at Zonamaco Foto y Anticuario, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

When the first photographic processes were invented and developped by Niépce and his followers in Europe, the photographic portrait was really born in America circa 1840. Robert Cornelius in Philadelphia and John Draper are the central figures.

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This quarter plate daguerreotype (circle of Johhn Draper, New York, circa 1840) will be presented at Zonamaco Foto, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

La Galerie du Palace invited French artist Lyes Hammadouche. Please come and visit his installation. The conjonction of rare daguerrian portraits from Europe and the Americas meet with the conjonstion of planets of a vintage armil.

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This “Planétaire copernicien” (Copernican Armillary Sphere, France, circa 1840) will be presented at Zonamaco Anticuario, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

The portrait session was a real adventure and often a unique event in each period of life (with the notable exception of the artists’ families). Some models have dramatically thwarted the operator’s efforts to capture the decisive moment.

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This early daguerreian portrait of three children (Philadelphia, circa 1843) will be presented at Zonamaco Foto, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

This invention of Daguerrian portraiture accompanied the formation of the United States and the birth of American culture. The portrait below is contemporary of the youth of Mark Twain, author of Tom Sawyer’s adventures.

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This sixth plate daguerreotype (W. V. Prentice, Savannah, Georgia, circa 1855) will be presented at Zonamaco Foto, 22 August 2016, Stand B-216.

Access to a selection (pdf)

PWT 29-2018

ZONAMACO SALÓN y ZONAMACO FOTO

regresan del 22 al 26 de agosto a la sala D del Centro Citibanamex de la Ciudad de México, con la más amplia selección de fotografía, antigüedades y otros objetos, de la mano de un sólido programa cultural en la plataforma de ferias de arte en México con mayor proyección internacional.